Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling affects gastrulation and spiculogenesis in the sea urchin embryo.

TitleInhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling affects gastrulation and spiculogenesis in the sea urchin embryo.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsKumano M, Foltz KR
JournalDev Growth Differ
Volume45
Issue5-6
Pagination527-42
Date Published2003 Oct-Dec
ISSN0012-1592
KeywordsAnimals, Blastula, Butadienes, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Enzyme Inhibitors, Fertilization, Gastrula, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Membrane Proteins, Mesoderm, Nitriles, Phosphorylation, Receptors, Notch, Sea Urchins, Signal Transduction, Time Factors
Abstract

The mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascade has been implicated in a wide variety of events during early embryonic development. We investigated the profile of MAP kinase activity during early development in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and tested if disruption of the MAP kinase signaling cascade has any effect on developmental events. MAP kinase undergoes a rapid, transient activation at the early blastula stage. After returning to basal levels, the activity again peaks at early gastrula stage and remains high through the pluteus stage. Immunostaining of early blastula stage embryos using antibodies revealed that a small subset of cells forming a ring at the vegetal plate exhibited active MAP kinase. In gastrula stage embryos, no specific subset of cells expressed enhanced levels of active enzyme. If the signaling cascade was inhibited at any time between the one cell and early blastula stage, gastrulation was delayed, and a significant percentage of embryos underwent exogastrulation. In embryos treated with MAP kinase signaling inhibitors after the blastula stage, gastrulation was normal but spiculogenesis was affected. The data suggest that MAP kinase signaling plays a role in gastrulation and spiculogenesis in sea urchin embryos.

Alternate JournalDev. Growth Differ.
PubMed ID14706077